A clinician feels a patient’s neck and throat lymph nodes during a physical exam

SOLUTIONS AREA

ENABLE EARLIER DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

The sooner the diagnosis, the more options for effective treatments.

Help Increase Compliance with the Diabetic Retinal Exam


Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of vision loss among adults 20-to-74 years of age,1 affecting 7.7 million people worldwide.2 Together, we have the power to help prevent diabetic retinopathy as a leading cause of blindness. Discover how—and join us. 

95%
95%

of vision loss due to diabetic retinopathy can be prevented with early detection.3

~60%
~60%

But diabetic retinal exam compliance is low.4

"" Up to 90%
Up to 90%

compliance is possible with diabetic retinal exams in primary care.5

95%

of vision loss due to diabetic retinopathy can be prevented with early detection.3

~60%

But diabetic retinal exam compliance is low.4

Up to 90%

compliance is possible with diabetic retinal exams in primary care.5

Help Increase Early Detection of Childhood Vision Disorders


Vision disability is the #1 disabling condition among children.6 Reliable vision screening is crucial to catch issues early and prevent vision loss in young children. Learn how we’re innovating to help make those vision screenings faster and more accurate.

"" 1 in 4
1 in 4

school-aged children have a vision disorder.7

"" Only 1 in 3
Only 1 in 3

have a vision screening before kindergarten.7

"" Eye charts
Eye charts

may fail to identify vision problems.8

"" 12 months
12 months

So the AAP recommends instrument-based vision screening as early as 12 months of age, if available.9

1 in 4

school-aged children have a vision disorder.7

Only 1 in 3

have a vision screening before kindergarten.7

Eye charts

may fail to identify vision problems.8

12 months

So the AAP recommends instrument-based vision screening as early as 12 months of age, if available.9

Expanding Diagnostic Capabilities in Primary Care


As more patients seek care outside the hospital, the role of primary care is changing.

Treating more complex patients—and working hand in hand with specialists across care settings—means there is a greater need to:

"" EXPAND
EXPAND

The diagnostic abilities of office-based clinicians

"" CONNECT
CONNECT

information throughout a network of specialists

"" DOCUMENT
DOCUMENT

and share information within the EMR

EXPAND

The diagnostic abilities of office-based clinicians

CONNECT

information throughout a network of specialists

DOCUMENT

and share information within the EMR

Improving Cardiology Screening and Diagnosis


Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States10—and COPD11 and stroke12 make the top five. An ECG may be the most important thing you do today. 

To detect and manage complex cardiac conditions, caregivers like you need diagnostic cardiology solutions that are:

"" SIMPLE
SIMPLE to align with your workflow
Data Points Icon SECURE
SECURE to protect PHI—wherever you need it
"" ACCURATE
ACCURATE for results you trust, every time
"" CONNECTED
CONNECTED to keep your caregivers up to date

SIMPLE

to align with your workflow

SECURE

to protect PHI—wherever you need it

ACCURATE

for results you trust, every time

CONNECTED

to keep your caregivers up to date

Diagnostic Cardiology

Detect and diagnose cardiac conditions faster and more accurately with ECG solutions that are simple, secure and connected.

Learn More

Physical Exam & Diagnostics

The earlier the diagnosis, the more options for treatment. Explore how our comprehensive line of physical exam tools can help.

Learn More

Patient Monitoring

Put vital signs data in the hands of the caregivers who need it—when they need it—with simple, secure and connected monitoring solutions.

Learn More

SmartCare™ Services

Tap into service programs that help you cut down on downtime and keep your equipment where it belongs—helping patients and caregivers.

Learn More

Watch how

play_circle_outline

Watch how

Saving vision starts with you.

References:

  1. Updated: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vision Health Initiative (VHI). https://www.cdc.gov/visionhealth/basics/ced/ Published September 29, 2015. Updated September 29, 2015. Accessed January 30, 2020.
  2. National Eye Institute. Diabetic Retinopathy Data and Statistics. https://www.nei.nih.gov/learn-about-eye-health/resources-for-health-educators/eye-health-data-and-statistics/diabetic-retinopathy-data-and-statistics Published July 17, 2019. Updated July 17, 2019. Accessed February 24, 2020.
  3. National Eye Institute. Diabetic Retinopathy. https://nei.nih.gov/health/diabetic/retinopathy. Accessed March 9, 2017.
  4. American Academy of Ophthalmology Preferred Practice Pattern Retina/Vitreous Committee. Diabetic Retinopathy PPP 2019. American Academy of Ophthalmology. https://www.aao.org/preferred-practice-pattern/diabetic-retinopathy-ppp Published October 2019. Updated October 2019. Accessed January 30, 2020.
  5. Mansberger SL, Gleitsmann K, Gardiner S, et al. Comparing the effectiveness of telemedicine and traditional surveillance in providing diabetic retinopathy screening examinations: A randomized controlled trial. Telemed J E Health. 2013 Dec; 19(12): 942-8.
  6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Improving the Nations’ Vision Health: A Comprehensive Public Health Approach. http://www.cdc.gov/visionhealth/pdf/improving_nations_vision_health.pdf 
  7. Zabba, Joel N. “Children’s Vision Care in The 21st Century & Its Impact on Education, Literacy, Social Issues & the Workplace: A Call to Action.” Journal of Behavioral Optometry (2011)
  8. Silverstein E, McElhinny ER. Traditional and instrument-based vision screening in third-grade students. Poster presented at: American Association of Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus; Mar 2018; Washington, D.C.
  9. American Academy of Pediatrics, Instrument-Based Pediatric Vision Screening Policy Statement, published in Pediatrics, The Official Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, October, 2012.
  10. Mozzafarian D, Benjamin EJ, Go AS, et al. on behalf of the American Heart Association Statistics Committee and Stroke Statistics Subcommittee. Heart disease and stroke statistics—2016 update: a report from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2016;133:e38-e360. 
  11. https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/copd
  12. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. Underlying Cause of Death 1999-2013 on CDC WONDER Online Database, released 2015. Data are from the Multiple Cause of Death Files, 1999-2013, as compiled from data provided by the 57 vital statistics jurisdictions through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program: http://wonder.cdc.gov/ucd-icd10.html. Accessed on Feb 3, 2015.