Cargiver with a Welch Allyn RetinaVue 700 Imager in hand, speaks with a patient.

IMPROVE HEDIS, STAR AND HCC RISK FACTORS BY CLOSING CARE GAPS FOR PATIENTS LIVING WITH DIABETES

Increase access to diabetic retinal exams with a simple, affordable and flexible solution.

Diabetic retinopathy is a growing problem for patients and healthcare providers — it is the leading cause of vision loss and blindness among adults between 20 and 74 years of age.1 Up to 80% of type 1 diabetic patients, 84% of type 2 diabetic patients who take insulin, and 53% of type 2 diabetic patients who do not take insulin will eventually develop some level of diabetic retinopathy.2 With early diagnosis and treatment, vision loss from diabetic retinopathy is 95% preventable.3

To help healthcare organizations enhance services to patients living with diabetes, the Welch Allyn RetinaVue care delivery model offers an easy-to-use solution for delivering diabetic retinal exams anywhere the patient is. While made for primary care settings, our solution includes all hardware, software and medical services needed to perform diabetic retinal exams effectively and economically at the point of care: mobile clinics, retail clinics, nursing homes and primary care offices.

a chart depicting 95% preventable

Check out the eBook below, "Improve HEDIS, STAR and HCC Risk Factors by Closing Care Gaps for Patients Living with Diabetes," to learn more about increasing access to diabetic retinal exams with a simple, affordable and flexible solution.

What's inside the eBook:
  • Expanding primary care services with diabetic retinal exams
  • Learn how teleretinal programs such as the RetinaVue care delivery model can help providers achieve the “Quadruple Aim” of healthcare
  • Understand how your patient data is secure with the Microsoft Azure Cloud
Cover of the eBook titled "Improve HEDIS, STAR and HCC Risk Factors by Closing Care Gaps for Patients Living with Diabetes"
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Download the eBook by completing the form.

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References
  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vision Health Initiative (VHI). https://www.cdc.gov/visionhealth/basics/ced/ Published September 29, 2015. Updated September 29, 2015. Accessed January 30, 2020.
  2. Duration of diabetes is a major risk factor associated with the development of diabetic retinopathy. After five years, approximately 25% of type 1 patients will have retinopathy, increasing to 80% after 15 years. For type 2 patients, the risk of developing retinopathy is 84% and 53% after 19 years for those taking or not taking insulin, respectively. Diabetic Retinopathy Preferred Practice Pattern® from the American Academy of Ophthalmology, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ophtha.2019.09.025, ISSN 0161-6420/19. Accessed July 29, 2020.
  3. National Eye Institute. People With Diabetes Can Prevent Vision Loss. https://www.nei.nih.gov/learn-about-eye-health/resources-for-health-educators/outreach-materials/people-diabetes-can-prevent-vision-loss. Accessed November 11, 2020.